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This page contains biographical sketches (full or extract) of former Eagle County residents.
The majority come from pre-1923 published sources as cited in the sketch.

If you have additions or corrections please contact Pat McArthur

This page was last updated Sunday, 23-Jan-2011 05:49:11 MST

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Eva Myra Booco ** George G. Booco ** George E. Bowland ** Arthur R. Brown


Eva Myra BOOCO

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 149 & 1347

Photograph

Mrs. Eva Myra Booco, superintendent of the public schools of Eagle County, and wife of George G. Booco, was born in Keokuk, Iowa, a member of a southern family that owned large numbers of slaves, besides valuable plantations. Her father, Henry Halloway Slaughter, was born in Virginia, to which commonwealth his ancestors had emigrated with the colonists of Jamestown. He was related to Governor Slaughter, at one time chief executive of New York state. In spite of the fact that his family were mostly southerners and slave-owners, he took his stand on the side of the Union. Receiving a number of slaves as his share in the family estate, he took them to Iowa and set them free. For this act he was severely censured by other members of the family. The freeing of the slaves left him a poor man, and when he started in business it was without capital. He opened a dry-goods store in Farmington, Iowa, and by industry and good management accumulated a competence.

The marriage of H.H. Slaughter united him with Mary Denny, whose ancestors crossed the ocean from Ireland in the "Mayflower," and some of the name, in after years, became large slave holders, but she was a strong believer in the Union cause. One of her brothers was killed in the Civil war. She is still living and makes her home in Keokuk, Iowa. Of her children, Charles Henry is a wealthy man and lives in Iowa, where for years he has been connected with a hardware business; Mrs. C.L. Becker, of Keokuk, is the wife of a wholesale dealer in hardware; Mrs. E.V. Nixon is the wife of a wealthy stockman of Arcata, Cal.; Mrs. W.F. Dwight lives in Kansas City; Mrs. William Coombs is a resident of Lynn, Mass.; and Mrs. H.A. Becker is the wife of a hardware merchant of Keokuk.

Upon completing her education, the subject of this sketch taught for five years, after which she traveled in California and the west for two years, and then taught in the schools of Topeka, Kan., for two years. About 1885 she came to Colorado, where she began to teach in Chaffee County, and for a time was employed at Poncho Springs. She came to Minturn to accept a position in the school here, and in this town met Mr. Booco, who was a member of the school board. They were married in 1891, and are the parents of a daughter, Florence Irene. Mrs. Booco is identified with the People's party and it was upon that ticket she was elected superintendent of schools of Eagle County in 1897, a position that her previous experience in teaching admirably qualifies her to fill. She has given educational work considerable thought and attention and is not only gifted intellectually, but is also a logical reasoner and acute observer, and labors constantly to improve the conditions of the schools under her charge. She is a sincere Christian and in religious belief is a Congregationalist.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur

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George G. BOOCO

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 149 & 1347

George G. BOOCO, the owner of real-estate and ranching interests in Minturn, Eagle County, was born in Indianapolis, Ind., and reared in Anderson, that state. In early manhood he was for a short time at West Lancaster, Ohio. At twenty-two years of age he came to Colorado and settled in Leadville, in 1879, during the boom days of that town. For several years he engaged in the mining business, leasing and bonding many well-known mines in that district, and he still owns shares in a number of mines there. Before the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad had extended its tracks to Eagle County he located a ranch at what is now Minturn, and it is upon his land that the town is built. It is situated in a small valley between the mountains, with a beautiful stream, Eagle River, running through its entire extent. There are rich mines of gold and silver in the vicinity and many mines waiting for capital to develop their valuable resources. The prospects for the growth of the town are bright. Mr. Booco has realized a considerable amount from the sale of his lots and still owns other lots that are advantageously located, besides which he has a fine ranch and comfortable home.

The father of our subject, William Booco, came west in 1879 and is now a well-to-do ranchman at Wolcott, Eagle County. He is the grandson of the founder of the family in this country, a Frenchman who accompanied Lafayette to this country and aided that famous general in liberating the colonies from their bondage to England. The mother of our subject was Margaret G. Gwinnup, who had three brothers that enlisted in the Union army during the Civil war and two died while fighting for the government. The paternal grandmother of George G. Booco was a sister of General Sherman.

In matters of politics Mr. Booco was a Democrat until the People's party was organized, since which time he has voted with the Populists and worked in their interests. He is deeply interested in educational affairs and has rendered able service as a member of the Minturn school board.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur

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George E. BOWLAND

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 1032

George E. Bowland, clerk of Eagle County and a prominent citizen of Red Cliff since coming to this place in 1880, was born in Summit County, Ohio, in 1852, a son of John and Cordelia E. (Hoyal) Bowland, natives respectively of Ireland and Vermont. His father, who settled in Ohio in early life, engaged in the commission business in Akron, Ohio, until 1849, when he went to California during the gold excitement in that state. He remained there for eighteen months, after which he returned to Summit County, Ohio. Afterward for five years he engaged in farming in Ohio, and then removed to Queenstown, Canada, where he carried on a mercantile business until 1874. During the latter year he came to Colorado, settling in Denver, where he resided until his death, in 1893. While he never took a very active part in public affairs, he kept informed concerning national questions and allied himself with the Republican party. His wife, who was the daughter of a merchant of Vermont and later of Ohio, has made her home in Denver, Colo., since 1874. Of her children, John H. is engaged in mining in Colorado; Frank D. and Fremont also reside in Colorado; Henrietta M. is the wife of Jackson Wheeler, a mine operator; Florence married Perry Hines, who is interested in mining at Cripple Creek; William and Charles also live in Colorado.

When the subject of this sketch was a child of five years his father moved to Canada, and there he spent the years of youth, obtaining his education in common schools. Upon starting out to make his way in the world he went to Chicago, where he was variously employed for five years. In 1874 he came to Colorado, and spent a short time in Denver, but soon went to Virginia City, Nev., where he remained until 1880; meantime he was engaged in the mercantile business for four years. He then came to the camp at Red Cliff, which had been started the year before, and here he has since been interested in mining. During much of the time since 1884 he has been in the county clerk's office, first as deputy, and in 1889 was first elected to the office, which he still holds, the present being his third term. He is conscientious and faithful in the discharge of his duties, and is a popular official.

In 1889 Mr. Bowland married Miss Mary A., daughter of Hon. Andrew Scanland, an influential attorney of Pittsfield, Ill., and for years judge of a district court in Illinois. To this marriage three children were born, Sue, Florence and Edward. In his political views Mr. Bowland is a strong silver Republican, and it is upon this party ticket that he has received his election as county clerk. He also served for some time as under-sheriff. In fraternal relations he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World. His wife holds membership in the Christian Church.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur 2009

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Arthur R. BROWN

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 1461

Arthur R. BROWN, ex-judge of Eagle County, came to Colorado in 1880 and settled in Leadville, where for two years he was interested in mining and also engaged in the practice of law. In 1882 he removed to Red Cliff, the county- seat of Eagle County, and a mining camp that was then three years old. He has witnessed the growth of the town from a small camp to a village of almost fifteen hundred people, and has himself contributed to its development. For some years he has devoted himself to mining and the practice of law, but after his first election to the office of county judge, much of his time was given to his official duties.

Judge Brown was born in Utica, N.Y., in 1850, a descendant of Peter Brown, who crossed the ocean in the "Mayflower." His paternal grandfather, a native of Stonington, Conn., and a colonel in the war of 1812, engaged for years in the manufacture of woolen goods and in the distillery business, accumulating a small fortune through his various enterprises. Politically he voted with the Democrats. His son, the judge's father, Lorenzo S. Brown, was born in New York state, where for a considerable number of years he followed the distillery business. He was a Republican in politics and prominent in local affairs. His last years were spent in retirement and he died when eighty-four years of age, his death occurring in Utica, of which city he had long been a prominent resident. He owned large tracts of real estate there and also had an interest in the banking business of A. H. Brown & Co., in which all of his brothers were also interested. Besides this, he owned stock and lumber interests. He married Elizabeth C. Brainard, a native of New York; her father, Maj. Chauncey Brainard, engaged in the mercantile business and the manufacture of woolen goods, having mills at Cedarville, N.Y., and was a major in the war of 1812. Some of the money he received when he was paid off by the government is now in the hands of our subject.

In the family of Lorenzo S. Brown there were three children. Clara B. became the wife of Timothy E. Wilcox, M.D., a surgeon in the regular army, with the rank of major. Susan M. is the wife of Adelbert J. Rhodes, who is engaged in the coal business in New York. Our subject who was the only son, spent his early years in his New York home, and was educated in the schools of Utica and the military school at Clinton, N.Y. On leaving school he went to Michigan, where his father owned large tracts of pine land, and there he engaged in the lumber business for eight years. In the interests of railroad bondholders, he went to Indiana, where he remained for seven years. Since coming to Colorado, his attention has been largely given to the practice of law and mining, and he not only owns mining interests of his own, but manages important properties for others. Fraternally he is a Mason, connected with the Knights Templar and Shrine. In politics he is a stanch Republican.

In New Bedford, Mass., Judge Brown was united in marriage with Miss Florence C. Shaw, a sister of Capt. Charles F. Shaw, who was an officer in the Union army during the Civil war, and a daughter of Frederick P. Shaw, who was a wholesale grocer in New Bedford, and later in Saginaw, Mich.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur

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