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This page contains biographical sketches (full or extract) of former Eagle County residents.
The majority come from pre-1923 published sources as cited in the sketch.

If you have additions or corrections please contact Pat McArthur

This page was last updated Sunday, 23-Jan-2011 05:49:02 MST

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Meyer B. Haas ** Jacob "Jake" Happel et al ** William C. "Wid" Herwick ** Henry James Holmes ** Thomas A. Howes ** William W. Huntington


Meyer B. HAAS

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 1073

MEYER B. HAAS, who has resided in Minturn since 1886 and is the owner of considerable property in Eagle County, was born in Holland in 1834, a son of Benjamin Philip and Christine Haas, who spent their entire lives in Holland, the former being engaged in business there. They were the parents of eighteen children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only one in Colorado. He was only seven years of age when, in the early part of 1842, he left his native land and took passage on a sailing vessel, which landed him in New York after a tedious voyage. from a very early age he has made his own way in the world, and while this prevented him from obtaining an education, it developed in him self-reliance and determination, qualities that assisted him in his business life.

Drifting west to Detroit, Mich., Mr. Haas was employed there for a few years. In 1853 he left that city and went to Chicago, where he remained for a short time. His next removal took him to Leavenworth, Kan., from which state, in 1858, he came to Colorado, settling in Denver, then a small town of tents, giving little indication of its future commercial importance. For three years he carried on a store, after which he returned to Kansas and spent several years in Leavenworth. Under Andrew Johnson he was appointed postmaster of Fort Leavenworth, which position he held for some time, and in 1866 was appointed postmaster in Fort Leavenworth. In his possession he has a passport, signed by William H. Seward, in 1863.

The business experiences of Mr. Haas in Kansas were less fortunate than those in Colorado. He lost $40,000 in Leavenworth, and was a poor man when he returned to Colorado in 1878. Settling in Leadville, he engaged in mining there and is still the owner of valuable mining interest in that place. For four years he held the office of city jailer in Leadville. He remained in that town until 1886, when he removed to Minturn, and has since acquired considerable property in this section of the state. Since the organization of the Republican party he has always voted for its principles and supported its candidates. He is connected with various degrees of Masonry, as well as the Knights of Pythias. In Leavenworth, January 27, 1864, he married Miss Louisa Segre, who died, leaving two daughters; Matilda, now the wife of Curt C. Darrow, an attorney of Butte, Mont.; and Charlotte, wife C. A. Ward, who is engaged in the restaurant business in Chicago. The present wife of Mr. Haas was formerly Lillian S. Van Hook, and was born in Kentucky, member of a southern family that originally resided in Holland.

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Jacob "Jake" HAPPEL et al

Eagle County Document List - Submitted by: Edgar Lewis Hunt
The Florida Keys - August 27, 1999

In my youth - some fifty years ago -- I spend summers on my grandfathers ranch in Cedaredge, CO. During one of these delightful stays I was given the job of herding sheep on another large ranch he and two uncles owned between Eckert and Paonia, CO. The huge two story main house was very old. It had castle-like turrets on the corners. It was constructed out of large blocks of sandstone that had been quarried from a nearby hill.

One day, while trying to pass the time while looking after the sheep far from the house, I explored a nearby forest. I found an old barn. The front had collapsed leaving the back wall leaning froward and a portion of the side walls still standing. I crawled through a window and looked around. While kicking into the pile of straw that had slid to the ground in a heel at the bottom of the collapsed loft, I uncovered a decaying old carpet bag. Inside, I found countless letters and documents in a moldy pile; the ones nearest to the outside of the pile had rotted, but many which were further inside were in perfect condition.

I gathered the letters and documents that attracted to my curiosity and placed them in my lunch bag. As an early student of history, their possession appealed to my keen sense of who had lived in my homelands and what they had experienced while living there.

The items lay stored away and nearly forgotten for over fifty years; until I became involved in researching my Colorado History and the part my family played in that history.

I have come to realize that undoubtedly the letters and document contain the names and activities of the some of the ancestors of people living today; that they place these kin at a certain time and in a certain place. This is information that is invaluable to a family genealogist.

For this reason, I herein list all of the pertinent information contained in the letters and documents. Unfortunately, I do not had translations made of the letters written in German.

I hope the information aids someone in locating some of his or her family history.

LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH EAGLE COUNTY MINING HISTORY

LETTERS:
1. In envelope with no address. One page letter in German dated 28 (?) 1879. (Apparently forwarded to him in another envelope, or kept by him in a newer envelope.)

2. Loose letter in German Dated (?) 11, 1879.

3. To Mr. Jocob Happel, Calumet, P.O. Mich. Postmark: Mill Home, Wis. Jan 5 1880. One page letter in orginal envelope.

4. To J.J Happel, Esq., Red Cliff, Colorado. From San Francisco, Dated April 14, 1891. One page letter in original envelope with 2 cent stamp.

5. To J.J Happel, Esq., Red Cliff, Colorado. From Sara, Wash., Dated April 24, 1891. One page letter in original envelope with 2 cent stamp.

6. To J.J. Happel Esq. from San Francisco. Loose letter in English Dated June 7, 1893

7. To Her. Jakob Happel, in care of Jakob Oefinger, Calumet, (?) P/O, Lake Superior, Mich. Postmark: Heboygan (?) Jan (?). One page letter in German, Dated (?) 9, 1815 over the word "Rhine."

MINING DEEDS:
1. From John McInerney to J.J. Happel, dated July 23, 1881. ½ interest in the Ready Cash, Fancy, American Eagle and Annie mining Claims --- Also 1/3 interest in the Virginia and the Combined Lode Mining Claims.

2. From Michael Neiuez to J.J Happel and John McInerney, dated Feb. 4, 1884. 1/3 interest in the "Three Nation" Mine Claim Lode.

3. From J.J. Happle to John McInerney, dated May 13, 1885. A 1/3 interest in the Ready Cash Lode Mining Claim.

4. From J.G. Giepin to J.J. Happel, dated Nov. 25, 1893. 1/16 interest in the "Maryland" Lode Mining Claim.

5. From Andrew Akervall to John J. Happel, dated Oct. 13, 1894. One-Eight interest in the Last Chance Lode, the John Jacob Astor Lode, and the Summit Lode.

6. From D.W. Smart to Jake Happell, dated Jan. 17, 1896. A 1/6 interest in the Hiekla Lode Mining Claim, Battle Mountain.

7. From James H. Richards to William Outwater, dated June 20, 1903. All right, title and interest in: The John Jacob Astor, The "Victoria" The "Washington" The "Dunderberg" The "Summit" The Enoch Arden, The "Heckley" and The "Last Chance" Lodes in the Battle Mountain Mining District. Also, all interest in the "Wanderer" Lode Battle Mountain Mining District.

8. From William Outwater to J.J. Happel, dated Dec. 2, 1903. All right, title and interest in: The John Jacob Astor, Victoria, Washington, Dunderberg, Summit, Enoch Arden, Heckley and Last Chance Lodes in the Battle Mountain Mining District. Also, all interest in the "Wanderer" Lode Battle Mountain Mining District.

LOCATION CERTIFICATES. (Some have the words "Amended" entered over the words "Location Certificate):
1. On the Ready Cash Mining Claim of (blank) Holy Cross Mining District. Filed by J.J. Happel and Bella Mayberry. Dated outside: Mar. 31, 1885. Dated inside: "Jany" 2, 1885. Handwritten "Re" before the printed word "located."

2. On the American Eagle Mining Claim of McInerney and Happel in Holy Cross Mining District. Dated outside: Oct. 29, 1885. Dated inside: Sept. 23, 1886. Handwritten "Re" before the printed word "located."

3. On the Fancy Lode Mining Claim of John McInerney et al in Holy Cross Mining District. Filed by John McInerney and J.J. Happle. Dated outside: Sept 11, 1886. Dated inside: July 6, 1886. Handwritten "Re" before the printed word "located."

4. On the Annie Lode Mining Claim of John McInerney and J.J. Happle in Holy Cross Mining District. Filed by John McInerney and J.J. Happle. Dated outside: Sept 11, 1886. Dated inside July 8 , 1886. Handwritten "Re" before the printed word "located."

5. On the Little Annie Lode Mining Claim. Filed by John J. Happle and Mathias Nemes. Dated outside: Dec 1, 1891. Dated inside September 15 , 1891.

6. On the Quartzite Bell Mining Claim. Filed by John J. Happle and Mathias Nemes. Dated outside: Dec 1, 1891. Dated inside September 15 , 1891. (Adjacent to the Little Annie Lode.)

7. On the Bismark Mining Claim. Filed by J. J. Happle. Dated outside: Nov. 21, 1893. Dated inside September 2, 1893.

8. On the Kaiser Mining Claim. Filed by John J. Happle. Dated outside: Nov. 21, 1893. Dated inside September 2, 1893.

9. On the New York Lode Mining Claim. Filed by J. J. Happle. Dated outside: Jan.2, 1898. Dated inside October 7, 1897. (For 150 on each side of the middle of said vain... from center of discovery shaft.")

10. (Amended) On the John Jacob Astor Lode Mining Claim of J J. Happle and Christ Summ, in the Battle Mountain Mining District. Dated outside: Jan. 30, 1904. Dated inside April 29, 1880. (For 150 on each side of the middle of said vain... from center of discovery shaft.") Lode discovered April 29, 1880.

11. (Amended) On the Durderberg Lode Mining Claim of J J. Happle and Christ Summ, in the Battle Mountain Mining District. Dated outside: Jan. 30, 1904. Dated inside Jan. 2, 1904. (For 150 on each side of the middle of said vain... from center of discovery shaft.")

12. (Amended) On the Victoria Lode Mining Claim of J J. Happle and Christ Summ, in the Battle Mountain Mining District. Dated outside: Jan. 30, 1904. Dated inside Jan. 2, 1904. (For 150 on each side of the middle of said vain... from center of discovery shaft.") Lode discovered March 1, 1883.

MINING LEASE:
An indenture certificate Dated Dec. 29, 1893, between LESSORS: P.A Anderson, S.M. Anderson, Cris Summ, D.E. Blair, Andrew Akervall, D.W. Smart and James Richards and LESSES: James H. Richards and J.J. Happell for the following mining claims:

The Washington Lode, The Summite Lode, The Heckley Lode, The Victoria Lode, The John Jacob Astor Lode, The Last Chance Lode, The Dunderdurf Lode, for the term of two years and two days, expiring on Jan. 1, 1896. Lesses to pay 10 percent of smelter returns.

ORE VOUCHER
Receipt and Assay Report from The Pueblo Smelting and Refining Co. to Happel and Richards dated Sep. 21, 1894, for two rail cars of ore -- 108 tons and 1860. Proceeds: $80.92 and $295.64.

QUIT CLAIM DEEDS:
1. Dated Dec. 31, 1897. Geo. E. Simonton, as assignee for the benefit of partnership and individual creditors of P. Tague, E.H. Lindsey, A.G. Mays and Josephine Mays, co-partners as the Eagle County Bank, for the sum of $28.00 assigns to J.J. Happel "Lot numbered forty-four (44) in block "B" in the Town of Red Cliff, together with the cabin situated thereon." Witnessed by J. Elmer Parkison.

2. Dated Jan. 6 1899. For the sum of $11.00, J.J. Happel assigns to the County of Eagle "Lots forty-three (43) and forty-four (44) in Block "B" in the Town of Red Cliff." Witnessed by Lee R. Willits.

3. Dated April 12, 1899. For the sum of $165.50, Geo. E. Simonton for the benefit of the Creditors of The Eagle County Bank, assigns to J.J. Happel "… as part of the undivided estate of Geo. H. Lindsey Lots 53 and 54 in Block "M" in the Town of Red Cliff." Notarized by Frank D. DeVolie. (Has 4 a $.10 "Documentary" stamps pasted near the lower left corner.)

4. Dated June 6, 1899. For the sum of $165.00, Geo. E. Simonton assigns to J.J. Happel "…an undivided one-half interest in Lots 53 and 54 in Block "M" in the Town of Red Cliff." Notarized by William F. Shaw. (Has a $.50 "Documentary" stamp pasted near the lower left corner.)

TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF PURCHASE:
1. L.S. Pierce, County Treasurer to Eagle County. Issued Nov. 16, 1895. For $10.76, assigned to J.J. Happel property that was delinquent in tax payments, from Geo. Smythe.

NOTICE IN LIEU OF ANNUAL LABOR: (Notice was made in compliance with the Act of Congress approved May, 18, 1894, amending Section 2324 of the Revised Statutes of the U.S. relating to mining claims.)
1. Dated Dec. 26, 1894. That J.J. Happel, as one of the owners of the Aurora Lode mining claim, gives notice and intends to hold and work said claim.

2. Dated Dec. 26, 1894. That J.J. Happel, as the owner of the Bismark and Kaiser Lode mining claim, gives notice and intends to hold and work said claim.

OTHER DOCUMENTS:

Two documents of the U.S. General Land Office: They are of high quality paper measuring over 15 inches by 10 inches. They are bound at the top by a red cloth ribbon that runs through holes to the back page whereupon it extends from the top right-hand corner to the bottom left-hand corner where it is secured by a red seal stamp. They are very impressive documents with the details entered in ink in fine penmanship

One is five page and dated Dec. 3, 1891. It is labeled "General Land Office No. 20725 and Mineral Certificate No. 3577." It acknowledges that J.J. Happel and John McInerney appeared at the Leadville Land Office "duly enter and paid for that claim or premises, known as Three Nations and Annie Lode mining claims in the Holy Cross Mining District, in the County of Eagle…"

Adjacent to the seal on the back page it reads: "IN TESTIMONY THEREOF I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America have caused these letters to be made PATENT and the SEAL OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE to be hereunto affixed.

" GIVEN under my hand at the City of Washington the Twenty third day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety two, and of the INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES the one hundred and sixteenth…. BY THE PRESIDENT.

The document is then signed by Benjamin Harrison - By M. McKean, Secretary and D.P. Roberts, Recorder of the General Land Office."

The second of these two document is identical to the one described above, with the following exceptions:

The ribbon is green.

It is only four pages and dated Feb. 15, 1893. It is labeled "General Land Office No. 23091 and Mineral Certificate No. 3765." It acknowledges that J.J. Happel appeared at the Leadville Land Office "duly enter and paid for that claim or premises, known as the Combined and Virginia Lode mining claims in the Holy Cross Mining District, in the County of Eagle…"

Adjacent to the seal on the back page it reads: "IN TESTIMONY THEREOF I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States of America have caused these letters to be made PATENT and the SEAL OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE to be hereunto affixed.

"GIVEN under my hand at the City of Washington the Twentieth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety three, and of the INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES the one hundred and seventeenth…. BY THE PRESIDENT.

The document is then signed by Grover Cleveland - By E. Macfarlaund, Asst. Secretary and L.L. Lancan (sic), Recorder of the General Land Office."

Historical Article: A map drawn on a 12X16 piece of parchment paper. It shows the location of the mining claim in and around "Holy Cross City" sited on Holy Cross Road. Starting the upper left hand corner with a claim on "French Lake" labeled Christianna and reading left to right, the claims are labeled: 5519 Tom Patterson, Newman, 5018 Midnight, 5013 Campbell, 6246 Alice, 2110 Pelican, 1978 Delpine, Sunrise, White Quail, 2111 Pelican Extension, 1889 Stockholm, Chance, 1976 Calumet, 1977 Little Mollie, 2450 Little Hope, 7768 Combined, Backus, 1820 Hecla, Grand Prize, 7768 Virginia, Eureka, 2638 Australia, 3625 Grand Trunk, Mollie Primrose.

Near the lower left-hand corner is the name "Sir William Wallace" with no claim lines drawn around it.

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The following eulogy was contributed by Carol McManus, Grand Junction
CCMcManus@aol.com

May 1999

Carol Crawford McMANUS is the author of a new book, "Ida, her Labor of Love", Western Reflections, Inc., Ouray, Colorado, 1999.

THE LIFE OF WILLIAM C. HERWICK
1879 - 1944

Written by: M. M. Neihardt, Aspen, Colorado

Since coming to Aspen, my greatest means of recreation has been in ranging these hills and fishing in the various streams and mountain lakes in this wonderful but awe inspiring region and going into the near inaccessible places. Here my spirits have been uplifted, my sense of devotion toward the Great Designer and Constructor of these stupendous and rugged mountains has been deepened and my feeling of insignificance has been intensified.

Not only has my submission to the Deity been enhanced, but I have also been made to feel little and weak in contemplation of the mighty exertions of the original settlers and explorers of this region. My companions on these excursions must have been bored by my oft repeated remark " I can't see how the first white men ever hewed their paths through these impossible regions."

It has been a never-abating wonder, not to say consternation, to me to reflect upon the imponderable difficulties of their task, so nobly accomplished. To me, whose lines have been laid in favorable and easy places, it seems that they accomplished the impossible and I take off my hat and bow my head and offer honor to these sturdy pioneers who opened up and conquered a new country -- a country where happy, God-fearing American homes now grace the landscape.

On a certain day, in the year 1880 had a lurking Ute been watching the trail which he and his people used in crossing from the Eastern to the Western slope of the Rockies, as it wound its way around the slopes of Battle Mountain, he would have seen a remarkable sight. Perhaps not remarkable to him since this was not a sole example of that remarkable movement of hardy pioneer into a wild and desolate country, but surely remarkable when viewed by the eyes of a person who has grown effete under the influence of civilization, as we are. First, this Indian would have seen a wagon loaded with such household goods and equipment as was absolutely necessary for human living. What kind of vehicle was it? How did it keep from upsetting as it rounded the mountainside? Look more closely. You will see that the wheels have been transferred leaving the small front wheels on one side and the large rear wheels on the other.

Next a woman leading a packed donkey and carrying under one arm a treasure dear to the heart of every woman, a mirror, and under the other arm a greater treasure for one who expected to establish a home in the wilderness, a framed motto, a visible expression of the constant prayer in her heart, "God Bless Our Home."

May I digress for one moment to rebuke any tendency we, in our modern superiority may have to smile at this example of primitive simplicity. We can all, perhaps, remember when no home was complete without this motto on the wall. My childhood home had one; perhaps yours did. But you rarely see them any more. I wonder if you often find a home so reliant on and submissive to God, either. Oh for the time to come when every American home shall not only have this motto on the wall but will also have this prayer continually within the heart of every member thereof. I hazard a prediction that when that time comes there'll be fewer broken homes and that the percentage of juvenile as well as adult delinquency will take a sharp decline.

But, to get back to the sight of the lurking Indian. Upon this Donkey was a burden hung panniard fashion. On one side was a lid-less trunk in which was a three year old girl. On the other a boot box in which was a one year old boy, William Herwick. Thus came our friend " Wid" to Colorado from the place of his birth in Jackson County, Kansas, where he was born June 5, l879. His sister, Mrs. Birdella Myers, was on the other side of this strange pack.

Traversing down to the foot of the mountain, the Father rearranged his wagon wheels in a more orthodox fashion and descended the Eagle river Valley to a point where Avon now stands and there established himself at his occupation of farming and stock raising. Here were born 12 other children of the fourteen, ten came to maturity, three having died in infancy and one at the age of thirteen.

The road down the Eagle River was then very different from what it is now. They did not speed along the paved highway at 70 miles a hour, nor yet at 50 or the legal 35. They came at snails pace the long arduous miles, in one of which miles they had to cross the Eagle River seven times to avoid the cliffs, swamps and other impassable places.

My own impressions formed during 30 years acquaintance can be summed up in the following words: Fair, Square, Frank, Open, Dependable.

Our friend leaves behind him his loyal wife, two sons, one daughter, three grandchildren, three sisters, five brothers, as well as a host of admiring friends.

We have met today to pay him a mark of esteem and honor. But, let us not fail to express to him also a token of gratitude, for without his labors and those of many others like him, you and I would not be enjoying the advantages which are ours today.

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Henry James HOLMES

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 136

HENRY JAMES HOLMES, editor of the Avalanche (daily) and the Avalanche-Echo (weekly), of Glenwood Springs, has been connected with the newspaper Business from early boyhood, and by sheer force of energy and determination, has risen from the position of apprentice to the head of an important publication. March 11, 1891, he moved his plant from Carbondale, a town thirteen miles from Glenwood Springs, to this city, where his previous publication, the Carbondale Avalanche, was continued as the Weekly Avalanche. In June of the same year he purchased the Glenwood Echo, the first paper published in this place, and by consolidation established the Avalanche-Echo. The first issue of the Daily Avalanche appeared May 6, 1891, since which time the paper has enjoyed a constantly increasing prosperity, and has wielded a large influence in local affairs.

Mr. Holmes was born in Portland, Me., November 18, 1852. His father, Thomas Holmes, a native of Ireland, emigrated to America with his family in early manhood and settled in Portland, Me. In Cork, Ireland, he married Fannie Caugblin [or Cangblin], who dies when our subject was a small child. The father, who has engaged in the shoe business during his entire active life, is still living in Lewiston, Me. Politically he is a Democrat. Of his children, Thomas M. is engaged in the retail shoe business in Lewiston, Me.; John W. lives in Meriden, Conn.; Michael J. is a shoe merchant of Lewiston, Me.; Margaret is the wife of J.J. Sullivan, of Charlestown, Mass.; Mary Ann married J.F. Constantine, a mill operator living in Lewiston, Me.; and Lizzie is the wife of W.J. Wills, editor of the Goldfield Dailey Leader, at Goldfield Colo.

When twenty years of age our subject became an apprentice in the office of the Daily Press, of Portland, Me., where he continued in that capacity until 1874, and afterward remained for three years on a salary. Meantime, he carried on his studies in night schools. From Portland he went into other towns in Maine, where he followed his trade. March 27, 1879, he started west, and arriving in Colorado, secured employment as a printer in Denver, but in the spring of 1880 went to Breckenridge, where he prospected for a year. Not meeting with much success, he sought other fields of labor, and packing his blankets on his back, he crossed the Ten-Mile range into Eagle Park. At Holy Cross, in Eagle County, he engaged in prospecting and mining until 1884. Later he worked in mines at Leadville for a short time. During the same year he rode on horseback from Leadville to Glenwood springs, and from this place went to White River, where he located a ranch. Soon, however, he abandoned the land, having determined that Glenwood was to be his future home. At that time the town had no houses, its site being unmarked save by a few tents, but he had faith in its future and believed at no distant day it would be one of the best towns in western Colorado. For a time he engaged in prospecting at Aspen, expecting to strike a vein of rich ore, but in this he was disappointed. Packing his blankets, he again sought Glenwood Springs, and accepted the first work that was offered him. For several months he worked at breaking rock in the tunnel of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, east of the town, after which he was employed in the office of the Ute Chief, a weekly paper, and in the spring of the following year (1887) he purchased the Daily News, a newly-started paper. This he conducted until 1889, when it was consolidated with the Daily Ute Chief, and soon afterward sold to George Banning. After disposing of it he went to Carbondale and purchased the plant of the Advance, the name of which he changed to the Carbondale Avalanche. The first issue of this paper was made July 12, 1889, and he continued to publish it until he moved the plant to Glenwood. The paper gives expression to the editor's opinions, which are strongly in favor of the re- establishment of silver upon a 16-to-1 basis, and also in favor of a protective tarriff which will protect home industries.

In 1891 Mr. Holmes married Miss Mary Nixon, of Lewiston, Me. They are the parents of five daughters, Carrie Nixon, Etta May, May Linn, Josephine and Clara Frances.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur

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Thomas A. HOWES

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 1091

The life of any man is of great benefit to the community in which he resides when all of his energies are directed toward advancing it's interest and when he is honest and irreproachable in his dealing with his fellow-men. To this class Mr. Howes belongs. He is a general merchant of Eagle, and has been identified with all enterprises of importance there, as well as with laudable movements for the progress of Eagle County and the development of is resources.

The only child of T. H. Howes, M.D., and Anna (Atwell) Howes, natives of New York and Maryland, the subject of this sketch was born in Indiana in 1841. His father, who graduated from a medical college in Cincinnati, was the son of a pioneer physician of western New York, and was himself a pioneer in the profession in Indian, where he died during the progress of the Civil war. His wife dad died in 1852. Their son, our subject, was reared in Indian. At twelve years of age he bacame errand boy in a general store at Rochester, Ind., where he remained until 1856. Afterward he was employed in a store at Logansport.

April 13, 1861, two days before the call was made for volunteers in the Union service, our subject enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Infantry under Colonel Melroy. After three months at the front he was discharged. On the 31st of July of the same year he enlisted in the Forty-sixth Indiana Infantry, in which he remained until the close of the war, meantime taking part in various engagements. After the siege and fall of Vicksburg he was commissioned first lieutenant, in recognition of meritorious conduct.

Returning to Indiana at the close of the war, Mr. Howes engaged in the general mercantile business in Carroll County, where he continued for many years, meeting with fair success. In 1892 he came to Eagle County, Colo., and established the general store which he has since conducted. In 1867 he married Miss Mary C. Dunkle, who was born in Indian, daughter of Peter Dunkle, a business man in that state. Mr. and Mrs. Howes have three children, viz.: John P., who is engaged with his father in business; May, wife of Frank D. Butcher, who is connected with the Vandalia Railroad in Indiana; and June, wife of R. M. Johnston, who was formerly in the drug business at Longansport, Ind., and now resides in Palouse, Wash.

The political belief of Mr. Howes brings him into touch with the Republican party, and he always supports the candidates of this organization. He is actively connected with the Masonic order and the grand Army of the Republic. His attention, however, is principally given to his business interests. Through his long experience in merchandising, an experience that dates back to his boyhood, he is enabled to conduct his business affairs intelligently and successfully, and the Howes Mercantile and Supply Company is one of the Flourishing concerns of Eagle County.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur

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William W. HUNTINGTON

"Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado, Containing Portraits and Biographies of many well know Citizens of the Past and Present"
Chapman Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899
Page 1201

WILLIAM W. HUNTINGTON, a well known mine operator residing in Gilman, Eagle County, Colo., became connected with the mines of Leadville in January, 1879, during the great boom in that camp. He was connected with the Leadville Consolidated Mining Company and the Small Hopes Mining Company until the spring of 1884, when he removed to Gilman, and since then he has acted as superintendent and manager of the Eagle Bird mines, the Eagle River and Tunnel Mining Company, the Ground Hog Tunnel Mining Company, and has had charge of the mines owned by D. H. Moffat, at this place.

Near Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y., Mr. Huntington was born in 1853. He represents the eighth generation of an old English family in this country. His grandfather, Samuel, who was born in New York state and spent his entire life there, taught his son, William S., the trade of a last-maker, which both father and son followed as long as they lived. Both were faithful adherents of the Presbyterian Church. William S. was a Mason in fraternal relations and a Republican in Politics. He died in New York state in 1891. His wife, Mary, was a daughter of William Walker, a prosperous farmer of New York state, where she still makes her home. She had but two children, our subject and Frederick W., who is now professor in one of the high schools of Brooklyn, N.Y.

The education of our subject was obtained in district schools, the Brooklyn Polytechnic School, and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He graduated in civil engineering with the class of 1876, after which he was employed on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. He came to Colorado in the early part of 1879 and has since become familiar with mining, in its every detail. He has never identified himself with politics, but keeps well posted in the same and gives his ballot to Republican candidates. During the year of his settlement in Gilman he married Anna Stroehle, who was born in Rock Island, Ill., but has made her home in Colorado since she was a small child. Two children bless the union, Walter C. and Helen L.
Contributed in 2009 by Pat McArthur

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